Hezbollah’s “Resilience” Fuels Israeli Determination!

The tougher things get for the Israelis at this stage, the more determined they will be to destroy Hezbollah. This is indeed developing into an existential war for Israel.

After all, what is Hezbollah from an Israeli perspective? Well, it is clearly an Islamist organization that, by the very nature of its ideology, still refuses to acknowledge Israeli’s right to exist, and still subscribes to the most vile of anti-Semitic myths around, including the blood libel and the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. In fact, Manar TV aired a TV series it itself had produced dealing with these issues very (unfortunately most of the actors were Syrians).

Moreover, even after the Israeli withdrawal from South Lebanon, Hezbollah raised the issues of the Shebaa Farm, despite the fact that they are not covered by UN Resolutions dealing with Lebanon, and the fact that they actually represent a disputed territory between Syria and Lebanon. This gave an excuse for Hezbollah to keep its weapons and go on living up to its ideology by attacking Israel. The fact that Hezbollah’s leadership might have ulterior motivations in this regard, related to their desire to strengthen the organization’s position vis-à-vis other communities in Lebanon, by adding a military dimension to the existing demographic one, and the fact that by adhering to claims of Shebaa’s Lebanese character, Hezbollah is serving the interests of one of its chief supporters and arms suppliers in the region, Syria, make the situation even worse, as it brings in considerations not related to the Arab-Israeli conflict per se to weigh in heavily on Israel and its security. Factor in Hezbollah’s link to Iran, its supreme backer and financier, and the current domestic and foreign entanglements of the Mullas regime, and the situation becomes even more urgent.

As such, it is not just Hezbollah’s ideological predilections that makes it dangerous from an Israeli perspective, its geopolitical alliances and its internal calculations and ambitions within the region and within Lebanon itself makes it a source of danger and concern as well.

And now it has shown that it has plenty of missiles, the know-how and the will to use them, and the ability to resist a ground attack like no other Arab army has done before. So, what could Hezbollah do, many Israeli strategists must be wondering by now, if it were given even more time to develop its potential? Can Israel really feel secure with such an organization along its borders?

Indeed, now that Hezbollah has amply demonstrated its strength, Israelis have more reasons to want to fight and destroy it now, before it is too late. Indeed, this was the goal from the very beginning, judging by the kind of rhetoric employed at the time by Israeli officials. Still, for some unfathomable reason, Israeli leaders seemed to have anticipated an easier time of it. Just as Hezbollah seems to have miscalculated the size and nature of Israeli reaction to its operation, so did Israeli military leaders misjudge the amount of initial and long-term investments they need to make to achieve their stated goals in Lebanon.

But the events of the last few days seem to have jolted many of these leaders and they now seem to be more aware of the complicated and arduous nature of the challenges ahead, and more determined.

No. This battle is not winding down. It is, in fact, just beginning, human costs for all sides notwithstanding. And should it drag out for long, its regionalization will become all but inevitable, the original intentions of the instigators notwithstanding as well.

18 thoughts on “Hezbollah’s “Resilience” Fuels Israeli Determination!

  1. I read your comments and most of the time dont know what you’re speaking on. The language is at times so obtuse and oddly sarcastic that it really is incomprehensible. You may say that Im not smart enough to understand your ramblings, but I say…please try to remain cogent so that we may understand you. I think you revise much, but question little that which angers you.

  2. I would tend to agree with your analysis if there were no other players in the picture. But I think the international community will place so much pressure on Israel (both directly and through the US) that Israel will be forced to stop proactive military efforts. Then an impotent and ineffectual international force will make a show of making things stable while Hezbollah consolidates its political and military power.Then a larger and bloodier conflict will occur in the future. Hezbollah has already won this round even if many Lebanese have lost.

  3. You have a point there Harbrook, I think the second part of the third paragraph might cause some confusion. Let’s rearrange it a bit:“The fact that Hezbollah’s leadership might have ulterior motivations in this regard make the situation even worse, as it brings in considerations not related to the Arab-Israeli conflict per se to weigh in heavily on Israel and its security.These ulterior motivations include: “Hezbollah’s desire to strengthen the organization’s position vis-à-vis other communities in Lebanon by adding a military dimension to the existing demographic one, and the fact that by adhering to claims of Shebaa’s Lebanese character, Hezbollah is serving the interests of one of its chief supporters and arms suppliers in the region – Syria. Add to that complications emanating from Hezbollah’s strong ties with Iran, and Hezbollah now has many reason for attacking Israel, many of which are not necessarily related to Israeli occupation of the Shebaa Farm, and other Arab Land. Albeit, such occupation does serve to provide an excuse.

  4. I assume by regionalization you mean the conflict will spread to other countries. I can tell you one thing though: it won’t. This will be just another proxy-war, what Lebanon is known for. Gemayel, Arafat, and Chamoun may be dead, but Nasrallah, Aoun, and Jahjah are still alive and there will be no unity that will allow Lebanon to disband Hezbollah. There will be peace for a few years, yes, maybe even 10, but Hezbollah will still be an armed militia and Lebanon will still be what it has been since its creation: a buffer-zone that has little to no effect on Syria or Israel.

  5. Major powers talk about Hezbollah as “the root problem”. Yes, Hezbollah is a problem, but not the root one. Occupation is the root problem indeed and until Isreal withdraws back to the line of 1967, peace will never be achieved in the ME. Some (like Bolton) would argue that Isreal needs to hold on to its occupation to “protect itself” from Arab military attacks, but as we have seen with Egypt and Jordan, these Arab countries have been respectful of their peace agreements. Good physicians are those who treat the DISEASE, not the SYMPTOMS. We need to understand that treating the disease of occupation, not its symptoms (like HA) is the best way to reach peace and democracy in the ME. Ammar, I really admire your motivation for a democratic solution for Syria, but at the same time you should promote for a peace agreement between Isreal and Syria. This should be a solid foundation for an easier transion toward a democracy. But agian, maybe this is why the Syrian regime is not interested in any peace resolution with Isreal. Ultimately to deal with the Assads, we should always seek using various treatments, not the same ineffective and maybe pricey one over and over. Syrian

  6. Actually, I have been involved in a number of initiatives meant to help re-launch the Syrian -Israeli peace track in the period 2001-2005. This one was the most important one, and as you can see, when push came to shove, it was Bashar who turned down the offer, so much for all his talk about peace.

  7. HA is not an Exclusively Lebanese problem as many of the regional players seem to indicate. That is why I am in agreement with your conclusion that this is bound to become a regional war even if the misguided Siniora plan is to be used as a basis for ending the present conflict. This is only a battle in the war that HA and its masters are committed for.The friction/conflict between HA and other political parties in Lebanon IS NOT similar to the usual differences between competing parties say in the UK, Germany or the US. In most vibrant democracies political parties differ about the means but share the same ultimate goal, the welfare of the state. The situation in Lebanon is vastly different. HA and the other political players differ on the means, which is healthy, but have different abjectives. The HA deesires are not concerned with Lebanese welfare or even Arab welfare for that matter. Their goal is the promotion of the Ummaby any means necessary, and that is not acceptable. We should never trade a belief in republicanism, democracy , human rights and individual freedom with that of despotism and authoritarianism.

  8. AmmarI am not sure that this conflict will drag on for much longer. I fear we will end up with half-backed solutions including partial disarming of Hizbullah. The reason is that Israel cannot sustain a long guerilla war on Lebanese terrain while being at the receiving end of hundreds of short and medium range missiles. Also no one seems in favour of turning this into a larger scale regional war.See new post:A country for rent

  9. Zenobia, Ghassan meant to say “Umma, by any means necessary.” Philip, indeed, your post is quite excellent, and, judging by the recent statements and move by France, the US and UK, the conflict might appear to be winding down, but, the question here is this: will Israel accept living by what appears to be a military defeat at the hands of Hezbollah? Bearing Nasrallah’s recent triumphalist statements, this could have severe repercussions for Israel. In the final analysis, it is much easier to start a war than to end it. I feel that this relative quiet on the Israeli side, might be a prelude to something.

  10. ok…..so what is “Umma, by any means necessary” ? ……and in anticipation of your next answer……. what is “Umma”?

  11. Umma is the word of the Universal Islamic Community or Nation, and Ghassan is trying to say that Hezbollah is more interested in this chimera than with the well being of the reality that is the State of Lebanon.

  12. AmmarI imagine Israel will swallow its pride, learn from its mistakes and receive sufficient compensation from the US. In any case, Israel has not taken many casulties and or lost the battle on the ground yet but it has certainly lost the propaganda war. It seems that the two sides have reached a critical point were potential use of longer range missiles (assuming Hizbullah really has them in significant quantities) would likely draw a more savage response from the US and Israel. Both Iran and the US must now be pulling on the reins.

  13. Philip I,America and Israel are spurring the horses. Watch what is done. Not what is said.

  14. First of ALL: mr. Anony omous said: Anonymous said……snip……snip…(is) Hezbollah as “the root problem”. Yes, Hezbollah is a problem, but not the root one. Occupation is the root problem.Mark Sez. BULLSHIT.Instead of the wimpy 1967 borders, ANY of you folks have the BALLS to accept the 1948 UN Two state PEACE solution????Let’s start there. NOT 1967.It’s PURE bullshit to say occupation is the root cause.WHY is there NO terrorist base AGAINST LEBANON or SYRIA or JORDAN?Let’s get to REALITY. You GUYS ALL attacked us 58 years ago LOST, and STILL claim that this land is ALL YOURS.Bull-Turds. Get over it. YOU LOST 58 years ago. We exist. We will NOT go anywhere. ALSO realize that I am for peace.I am just sick of this “company” line at the cause of the problems….snip… (anonymous continued here) ….indeed and until Isreal Yes, and israEL is REAL (IsraEL), and WILL REMAIN REAL. (that’s an awful terrible pun, and I apologize that I couldn’t resist his typo.)…snip…withdraws back to the line of 1967, peace will never be achieved in the ME. Some (like Bolton) would argue that Isreal needs to hold on to its occupation to “protect itself” from Arab military attacks, but as we have seen with Egypt and Jordan, these Arab countries have been respectful of their peace agreements. –> I agree IMHO Bolton is a piece of Bull-turd!–snip–Good physicians are those who treat the DISEASE, not the SYMPTOMS. We need to understand that treating the disease of occupation, not its symptoms (like HA) is the best way to reach peace and democracy in the ME. I disagee. I think that the “Castrophe” as most arabs refer to Israel’s independence day,is a very very very telling symptom of what Amarji agrees is an INBRED disease.If you claim the 1967 borders are the problem today, TOMORROW you will be claiming it is the 1948 borders.DONT BOTHER. UNTIL you can ACCEPT the fact of Israel’s existance, then don’t bother complaining about the occupation, or a right of return..And Amarji is very correct. Hizbollah has managed to entirely unify the ENTIRE Israeli population INCLUDING almost everyone in the PEACE NOW movement.And If you read my blog, you will see I totally agree that the problems and causes for this problem go SQUARELY back to the BRITISH mandate over the defeated Ottaman Empire after WW I.As a matter of fact, I see a prime villian as Sir WINSTON Churchill, who was the Governor of the British Mandate in 1922.Sigh.History repeats itself again.ANd… Anonymous. Come out of the closet. I’m jewish, and I did it here too!You can too!

  15. Perhaps you would suggest that the entire region submit to the United States of America and it’s client state Israel. Today it is Lebanon, tomorrow it will be Damascus, and Baghdad. Woops, they’ve already got that last one! The answer is not with our corrupt governments, nor is it with all of us bowing down to foreigners. We just need the courage to make a principled stand. That courage can only come from within.

  16. In principle, I actually agree, but standing up against everybody and everything at the same time strikes me as being somewhat foolhardy. My argument centers on the fact that our regimes with their corruption and inefficiency have been preventing us from effectively standing up to anyone who impinges on our sovereignty. Meanwhile, they have being doing a lousy job doing the standing up themselves. So, I am just suggesting that we might just need to change our priorities. We have always tried standing up to Israel and the US first, now I suggest we try to stand up to our regimes first. Perhaps when we are free of them, we wouldn’t have to submit to anyone.

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