Syria: Civilians in Homs Trapped While UN Runs

Quoted by Rhonda Parker, Examiner.com

Syrian in exile and Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies out of Washington D.C., Ammar Abdulhamid, has been calling for more active international intervention in Syria, and added another addendum in his Syrian Revolution Digest Syria report last night. Continue reading

Death Toll Climbs Now in Hama Bombing

Quoted by Rhonda Parker, Examiner.com

However, as Washington-based Syrian pro-democracy advocate Ammar Abdulhamid stated on his Syrian Revolution Digest website, “This revolution is against the Assad regime not just against Assad, the sooner the Russians and Chinese understand that the better.”

For Tuesday’s death toll, Adulhamid also documents a total of 54; with 15 dead in the town of Hiffeh (Lattakia Province), 13 in Hama; 9 in Homs; 5 in daraa; 2 in Aleppo, 3 in Damascus and 1 in Hassakeh.

Syria’s Revolution: An Interview with Ammar Abdulhamid

Interviewed by Barry Rubin, PJ Media

(Ammar Abdulhamid has been the most articulate and credible voice of the Syrian opposition and the movement to overthrow the current regime. Barry Rubin interviewed him to get a clearer view on what’s going on in Syria and on what the future prospects are for the bloody conflict.) Continue reading

As Syria Violence Continues, World Leaders Do Little

The Washington Post

The United States has closed its embassy in Damascus amid the Syrian ruling junta’s increasingly violent crackdown. As China defends its veto this weekend of a U.N. resolution that might have amounted to nothing more than strong condemnation, the Assad regime, buoyed by continuing Russian and Iranian political and logistical support, including arms shipments, is escalating its murderous rampage. Its goal is to crush the rebellion by brute force; meanwhile, international confusion regarding what can or needs to be done precludes any international effort to protect the protesters. Continue reading

Ammar Abdulhamid on Syria’s uprising

Rights activist says the international response to violence in Syria is merely “symbolic” and “rife with hypocrisy”: an interview on Al-Jazeera online:

Rights groups have estimated that at least 1,600 people have died since the start of the uprising in Syria in March, but that number might increase considerably by the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. Since Sunday alone, at least 150 people have been killed in Deir ez-Zor, Hama and Al-Buka-mal – a bloody progression from battles and sieges in other cities and towns such as DeraaHomsLatakia and Jirs al-Shughur. But how long can the protests – and the severe crackdowns on them – continue? Ammar Abdulhamid is a Syrian human rights activist and founder of the non-profit Tharwa Foundation (which promotes democracy and development in in Syria as well as the broader region). He told the foreign affairs committee of the US House of Representatives in the spring of 2008 that, “Change in Syria is not a matter of ‘if’ anymore, but of ‘when’, ‘how’ and ‘who’.”  Three years later, he still feels the same, and the questions seem closer to being answered by the nation of Syria itself. Abdulhamid tells Al Jazeera what he thinks of the of the international response to the unrest and how he sees the government and protesters arriving at their end games. Continue reading